National Physical Fitness and Sport Month

May is National Physical Fitness and Sport Month, which is geared to help restart your commitment to physical health and wellness.  From children and adolescents, to adults both young and old, this campaign raises awareness of the benefits of physical fitness, as well as fun ways to stay active.[1]

The American College of Sports Medicine recommends adults get at least 2 ½ hours of exercise per week.  This allows for five sessions ranging from 30 minutes to an hour.  Break up your routine by focusing on endurance sports, as well as cardiovascular and strength training.  Perhaps this is the perfect time to learn something new.  Grab a friend and try tennis, basketball, or find a new trail to hike in your area!

Not only does physical exercise make you feel (and look!) good, but the benefits of routine exercise prevent numerous health issues.  Heart disease and stroke are the number one causes of death in the United States. Regular exercise greatly lowers your risk of cardiovascular disease by lowering your blood pressure and improving your cholesterol levels. Regular physical activity also lowers your risk of developing type 2 diabetes by controlling your blood glucose levels.  Further, research also shows that doing regular balance and muscle-strengthening activities improves bone and joint strength while reducing the risk of falling.[2]

Not only does exercise benefit your physical health but your mental and emotional health as well.  It may also improve sleep and reduce the risk of depression.

If you are experiencing pain which might limit your ability to participate in National Physical Fitness and Sport Month, whether it be due to an acute injury or surgery, physical therapy can greatly reduce your pain and help you return to the activities you once loved to do. We offer both orthopedic and spine-specialized therapy, as well as, sport-specialized therapy.

Call us today to schedule an appointment at (303)327-5511 and start on the journey to a pain-free life.

 

[1] https://healthfinder.gov/NHO/MayToolkit.aspx

[2] https://www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity/basics/pa-health/index.html